Riders point out that sumo statue scares their horses in equestrian competition


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Riders point out that sumo statue scares their horses in equestrian competition

Most of the obstacles on the track have some Japanese decoration: kimonos, a small palace or taiko drums

KAMIYOGA – To the jump riders they don’t like surprises. Nor to their horses, those who avoid scares take years of training.

And none of the horses who participated in Tuesday’s Olympic jump tie had seen something like the obstacle number 10.

“When you turn around, the first thing you see is (the butt of) a fat guy,” said the British rider. Harry charles.

“There is a lot to see,” added the Irishman. Cyan o’connor.

“It is very realistic,” declared the Israeli Teddy vlock.

The riders assure that a life-size statue of a sumo wrestler located to one side of the 10th obstacle may have distracted several horses. Some pairs came to a halt before the obstacle, racking up enough penalty points not to advance to the final on Wednesday.

The statue is located to the left of an obstacle placed in a corner of the arena. Crouched and ready to attack, the fighter turns his back on the horsemen approaching, which means that when exiting a sharp turn to make the jump, the first thing the horse and the human being see is a fighter half covered by his mawashi.

“I saw that about four or five horses got scared by that,” he said. Charles.

Most of the obstacles on the track have some Japanese decoration: kimonos, a small palace or taiko drums.

None captured as much attention as the sumo wrestler.

One of the horses affected was that of the French Penelope Leprevost, who won gold in team jumping in 2016. She is not sure if it was the wrestler who deconcentrated her 12-year-old stallion, Lanlore Vancouver.

“Maybe,” he said. “We try to relax our horses around the bend, and they might be surprised to see a vertical so close. I do not know.

Vlock finished 34th out of 73 competitors. After seeing that others had problems, he and his coach Darragh kenny, an Irishman who also competed on Tuesday, set about leading their horses to the 10th hurdle to familiarize the animals with their surroundings before their race turn.

“We hope the familiarity gives them value.

“It is very realistic,” he reiterated Vlock. “It looks like a person, and that’s kind of a scary thing. You know, horses don’t want to see a guy, or what looks like a guy, next to an obstacle, staring at them like they’re ready to fight. “

Vlock Y Kenny they cleared the obstacle without problems. Kenny finished in second place without penalty points and a time of 82.01, while Vlock was left away due to other problems.

Of course, it is difficult to know what goes through the mind of a horse. Some of the riders attributed the problem to how close the obstacle is to the curve. Others pointed out that it was the stadium lights, which also raised concerns at the first obstacle.

The medal contenders, the British Scott brass and the swiss Martin Fuchs, believe that the cherry trees located on the other side of the obstacle were the main responsible.

Whatever the cause, Olympic veterans are not surprised. The joust has a reputation among riders for its unconventional designs.

“To be honest, it is something you expect from Olympic Games“, He commented Brash.

And it’s OK.

“You know it will be decorative. And it’s beautiful you know It’s fantastic. That is what makes it a championship. If they were simple obstacles, it would be like any other week.


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