Venezuelan rookie Luis García, Astros pitcher, shrinks in World Series


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Venezuelan rookie Luis García, Astros pitcher, shrinks in World Series

HOUSTON – Houston Astros starter Luis Garcia had too much left in the World Series …

Garcia again failed this Tuesday. He only endured two and two-thirds innings, in which he accepted two hits; the second was an impressive 446-foot hit from designated Jorge Soler with two on board, making it 3-0 from the third inning in favor of the Atlanta Braves.

Soler hit a full account on an 83 mph cutter with Ozzie Albies and Eddie Rosario on base, both of whom Garcia had allowed singles and walked away, respectively.

Garcia struck out three and walked away, in just his second major league start with a short rest.

Before, Garcia had only had one start with three days off as a starter, on April 29 against the Seattle Mariners, and on April 25 as a reliever against the Los Angeles Angels.

It was a very bad World Series and overall postseason for the Astros’ rookie starter. In five playoff starts, only once did he exceed four innings; in the second outing of the AL Championship Series, when he pitched 5 2/3 innings on a one-hitter, no runs.

In the other four starts he combined to allow three home runs, including two Grand Slam, 14 earned runs, including four in the World Series.

OPEN THE ROOF WITH PERFECT WEATHER

The Astros played for the second time in this World Series with the roof of their Minute Maid Park open, at the direction of the Major Leagues.

This was the case in Game 2, albeit with the difference that it was open from batting practice, compared to the week before when it was open until both teams finished their pregame routine because a light rain fell in the afternoon.

This time, batting practice began at 78 degrees Fahrenheit and the first pitch was at 68 degrees.

It is the first postseason the Astros’ park has had its roof open during games since 2005.

MARATHONIC MATCHES OF THE SERIES

The first five games of the World Series were marathons, averaging three hours and 41 minutes; the longest in history.

Last year, the Fall Classic between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Tampa Bay Rays averaged 3:37 hours in its six games.

Major League Baseball Commissioner Robert Manfred warned that it is impossible to continue holding such long games because they are difficult for fans to entertain and although the Players Guild opposes, they seriously analyze imposing the mandatory pitch clock for pitchers, in order to streamline the matches.


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