Australia says Djokovic "is not captive" and can leave anytime

The world’s number one tennis player, the Serbian Novak Djokovic, is free to leave the hotel in the city of Melbourne, where he has been held since Thursday after the cancellation of his visa to return whenever he wants to his country of origin, said today the Australian Home Secretary Karen Andrews.

Djokovic, who arrived in Melbourne on Wednesday night with a medical exemption that allowed him to defend his title at the Australian Open without being vaccinated, is being held in a hotel run by immigration authorities awaiting Australian justice to address Monday an appeal against your deportation.

“Mr. Djokovic is not held captive in Australia (because) he is free to leave at any time he decides to do so and the Border Force will surely facilitate it,” Minister Andrews said in an interview with Australian public broadcaster ABC .

The comment comes after the Serbian Foreign Ministry presented a formal protest on Thursday to the Australian ambassador to Serbia, Daniel Emery, for the “indecent treatment” that the tennis player is receiving in Melbourne.

According to a government statement, Serbia expects Emery to make a personal effort for Djokovic to obtain adequate accommodation for an athlete of his rank while awaiting the court’s decision.

The Australian Interior Minister also defended today the decision of the immigration authorities that had granted the 34-year-old Serbian a visa and later revoked it, since it was determined when he arrived in the country that he did not have sufficient evidence to show that meets the requirements imposed in Australia by the covid-19 pandemic.

“It is the responsibility of the person to ensure that they have all the necessary documentation that is needed to enter Australia,” Andrews said.

The dispute over the medical exemptions granted by Tennis Australia and the regional government of Victoria have motivated the Executive of Canberra to investigate similar permits granted to at least two other people participating in the tournament in Melbourne, which will be held between 17 and next January 30.

The vaccine is mandatory to enter Australia, but there are temporary exemptions for people who have “a serious medical condition”, who cannot be vaccinated because they have contracted Covid-19 in the previous six months or have had an adverse reaction to the drug, Between other reasons. EFE